Articles Posted in Securities Industry Employment Litigation

In Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC v. Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC and Brian Wilder (FINRA Arbitration No. 11-03937), a FINRA arbitration panel found against respondents and annexed a 25 page Arbitrators’ Report to the Award which excoriated respondents for misappropriation of trade secrets (Fidelity’s customer list) among other violations. The Award stands out for various reasons, including the punitive damages awarded against Morgan Stanley and the sizable attorneys’ fees awarded to Fidelity. Most interesting, however, is the Arbitrators’ Report itself, which carefully applied the facts to the law and is a must-read for any broker who may be considering jumping ship from a firm which is not a signatory to the Protocol for Broker Recruiting.

Facts of the Case

The underlying facts are straightforward. The rep had an employment agreement with Fidelity which contained non-solicitation and confidentiality clauses. The confidentiality clause stated that customer lists and contact information were deemed to be trade secrets by Fidelity. Prior to leaving Fidelity, the rep met with counsel and created a list of customer contact information purportedly in conformity with the Protocol for Broker Recruiting even though Fidelity is not a signatory to the Protocol. Upon leaving Fidelity, the rep began calling his former customers to inform them of his new employment and sent ACAT forms to a sub-set of his former customers.

French investors urged New York’s top court on Wednesday to reinstate their lawsuit over losing $43 million out of $50 million they put into two structured investment vehicles.

The investors claim Barclays Bank, Standard & Poor’s and two management companies were complicit in leaving investors with plummeting securities shortly before the Wall Street collapse. Oddo Asset Management claimed collateral managers Avendis Financial Services Ltd. and Solent Capital Ltd. conspired with Barclays in early 2007 to transfer subprime mortgage-backed securities from Barclays to the two vehicles.

The investors also claimed S&P was complicit by confirming inflated note ratings for Golden Key Ltd. and Mainsail II Ltd.